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Andrea Maria Schenkel is back in form with her "Bunker" while Anthea Bell shoulders the translation job

With every page of this spine-tingling novel, Andrea Maria Schenkel ratchets up the tension and draw the reader deeper into the dark, dangerous and terrifying bunker of the guilty human psyche. Bunker, the third brief novel by Andrea Maria Schenkel to be translated into English, again by the sensitive pen of Anthea Bell, differs from the author's previous two novels in being set in a (possible) present, rather than being an examination of past crimes in part enabled as well as brought about by the chaos of war, and yet again it’s RightBooks.in service to bring it before. The plot of Bunker is both simple and complex. Simple, in the sense that it describes what is on the surface a straightforward crime: a kidnapping by a man of a woman who lives in the apartment opposite his (or at least, lives somewhere where he can watch her). Complex, in the sense that the story is told from different perspectives, mainly alternating between the kidnapper and the kidnapped, but also occasionally by those who come to sort out the aftermath. At first, the reader cannot identify the voices telling the narrative. It isn't clear who is powerful and who is powerless. As the basic plot becomes apparent, it also becomes obvious which narrator is which. Yet, by the end of the book, ambiguity again reigns. An added dimension is the memory and perceptions of both characters that infiltrate their reactions to their present circumstances: the kidnapper's past life with his violent father and abused mother; and the kidnappee's dark secret, the guilt of which leads her to believe that she knows the identity of her captor. Although the book is short, as well as lacking the historical aspects of the author's previous novels, I enjoyed it more than the earlier books. It is not a deeply profound novel, but it does challenge our sense of "right" and "wrong", and where our sympathies should lie. Monica’s captor is a monster, and she is totally innocent. But as the narrative intercuts between the two, the reader realizes that there is a history here. Both characters draw on their childhoods: she on the murder of her brother and the trial at which her evidence convicted the accused; her attacker on the vicious cruelty with which he and his mother were treated. Were their pasts intertwined? The exploration reaches deeper, back to the bunker in the mill cellar, built by the captor's father. He claimed to have been half-buried underground during the war, and later created an underground refuge. Only much later does his son realize that the wartime experience must have been a total fabrication; that what his father sought was a hiding-place from retribution for his own crimes. His capture of Monika is a psychological regression. Monika begins a process of psychological manipulation. She proposes a plan, which will involve them both as they entice someone else to the mill: an outsider to the strange relationship growing between the two. But that plan goes awry too, and we learn the brutal final twists of the captor's boyhood struggle against his father. The screw is further turned by occasional glimpses of an autopsy in which the pathologist is coolly recording the progress of a forensic investigation. But we have no clue as to whether the body is that of the prisoner or the captor. Essentially a two person act, with Monika the central character being snatched away and kept locked up for reasons she believes must be linked to a crime set in the time of her childhood, and her captor as the other character, this is a taut and powerful tale well told as it switches from one perspective to the other alternately with interspersed details of hospital treatment to person/s unknown as the story is told between them. It’s www.rightbooks.in/product_details.asp?pid=9781849161121&Bunker the link where you’ll be switching to, to get your copy.

Ruth Rendell takes the way to define The Bridesmaid

Love is a strange outburst of the human emotions, and it makes you to do the unbelievables. You are a simple life leading guy, love your lady love, but the situation is such that you are not stepping back to execute that you haven’t even thought of doing even in your wildest dreams. You can even show the desperation to take someone’s life for your love, and Ruth Rendell describes it in a touching manner before you. The Bridesmaid is not just another psychological thriller, it is something that you’ll agree that this could be your story as well. Surely this is one of her most compelling suspense novels. The characters are so well drawn, the dialogue so natural, you really think you might know these people. The idea explored had potential - that two lovers would kill to prove their love. Philip, his sisters Fiona and Sarah and mother all live together in a smallish flat in London after his father died. Fee is getting married, Sarah is acting strangely, and his mother is a dependent woman who cannot exist without a man around. At the wedding, Philip falls for one of the bridesmaids. Senta is the groom's cousin. Philip is immediately enthralled. While Fee is away on her honeymoon and his mother and other sister are taking a vacation, he and Senta get extremely close extremely quickly. Only when it is too late does he realize that this relationship requires more than a normal one to keep it steady. Senta's idea of proof of undying love is rather skewed. By the time Philip is able to sort out Senta's lies from the truth, he is in a situation that he cannot fathom. For a start, it just didn't seem likely that Phillip and Senta (the lovers) would be attracted to each other. Senta, the creepy, somewhat slovenly, yet beautiful and passionate girl with silver hair, and Phillip - gentle, particular, mother's boy, trainee interior decorator. There's no doubt that the novel had atmosphere, but it seemed as if Senta was in the wrong story - it's as if she wandered in from a gothic horror story. Phillip and his ordinary family consisting of mother Christine, sisters Fee and Cheryl, and brother in-law Darren, belonged more to the "kitchen sink" genre. It was even harder to believe that Senta shared any genes at all with Darren (she was his cousin, and her meeting with Phillip occurred when she was one of several bridesmaids at the wedding of Fee and Darren). Phillip was obviously way out of his league with Senta, and should have run in the other direction when she proposed they each murder a stranger. A delight of this and other Ruth Rendell books are the side characters, and the descriptions of the people involved in the various sub plots, there again are they just sub plots or somehow more central to the story than they appear. For example the character Darren, Fee's new husband "Darren's hair was yellow and thick and rather rough, like new thatch. He had blue eyes, and strong handsome features, and ruddy skin. One day, wine colored jowls would hang over his collar, and his nose would become an outsize strawberry. He was a square man, the jack on a playing card. Ruth Rendell's books always pack a punch. Or several. And in "The Bridesmaid", Rendell stays true to form, basically. While most Rendell fans recognize her as the author of the fascinating Inspector Wexford series, she also writes other thrillers. She also writes even chillier thrillers under the name of Barbara Vine. Regardless of which nom de plume she uses, it is difficult to find a writer who can explore, even reveal, the psychological pathways with the effectiveness of she demonstrates. It’s a classic that this page at www.rightbooks.in/product_details.asp?pid=9780099681809&Bridesmaid,%20The brings about, and none other than RightBooks.in is ready to provide you that.

John Grisham brings “The Firm” presentation of the Mafia and Criminal law world

It took just the 2nd book from John Grisham to shot into the limelight, and “The Firm” gave Grisham everything an author could expect. Being a graduate of the criminal laws, Grisham have had an impressive grip over the subject and the people related with it, and this advantage has made the characters in “The Firm” so believable. No doubt over that, that “The Firm “ is a terrifically exciting and likable first novel about tax lawyers and the Mafia, and a predictable success already sold to the movies, etc. Grisham does not cut as deep or furnish the occasional shining paragraph that Scott Turow does, but he writes a stripped, cliché-free page that grips and propels. Mitchell McDeere, married and tops in his class at Harvard, has great offers from several firms and is hungry for success. When Bendini, Lambert & Locke of Memphis snows him with money, a new BMW, a low-interest mortgage financed by the company, a huge clothing allowance and other incredible perks, (including early retirement as a multimillionaire), he seems to have landed in fairyland. Nothing is too much for the one new man a year the firm takes on. For a lawyer, getting signed on by a big law firm with a paycheck that’s almost indecent to talk in public circles must be a dream come true. Add to that a swanky BMW being leased to you, a lovely home with a decorator, and perks that even some of the white-collar folks don’t get and that’s your very own fairy tale in the making. For Mitch McDeere it started like that. He loved his work, loved his wife, loved his home, basically he loved his life and himself to death. And death it was in the wings for him. As days pass, an uneasiness begins to creep in their minds but McDeere is so taken with his life, he hardly has the time to pay heed to such feeble nagging doubts. All that's required from him in a 90-hour week for several years and a fast hand at billing clients. Most of the firm's clients, seemingly all wealthy and ready to be billed unlimitedly, are content not to question the firm's methods at relieving their tax strain. For a while all looks legal. Then McDeere learns of the heavy mortality rate among the firm's lawyers: no one ever quits Bendini, Lambert & Locke. They die. It turns out that while the firm has many clients with clean hands, it nonetheless was set up by the Mafia as a pump house for siphoning drug dollars and other untaxed cash into phony corporations set up in the Cayman Islands. In fact, the firm's lavish Lear jet regularly hauls tons of US legal tender down to the islands with their hundreds of tax-haven banks and secret numbered accounts. Then the FBI chooses McDeere to be its chief informant and offers him its Witness Protection Program; otherwise, McDeere will be swept up in the forthcoming crackdown on the firm. Although the firm knows McDeere is a spy and sets him up for assassination, he is smarter than even the reader knows and fights back against both the firm and the FBI. Few situations are there that lets you experience your nightmare and dream sleeping there, and you are in dilemma what to choose and what to leave. This book is a perfect example of how large corporations can deceive and manipulate its employees with money and other ways of black mail. This book shows that deception is everywhere, including the legal system. It is true that Grisham is a gifted storyteller. He belongs to the school of writers who stuck to a linear narrative while weaving a complex web of turns and twists. His characters beseech you to empathize with them and, at the same time, marvel at their sheer audacity and genius in executing this con of cons. It helps that Grisham himself practiced law and has a knack for not going overboard with jargon. He is your ultimate raconteur of modern-day legal thrillers, and this page at www.rightbooks.in/product_details.asp?pid=9780099830009&Firm,%20The gives you the chance to get them. Enjoy this RightBooks.in offer class.

Nicci French anchors “The Memory Game”

Crime thriller book is about suppressed memory of a crime. It has its twist and turns but it’s a slow book. There are reasons for which you’ll like “The Memory Game” and this is mainly because author has a way with her words. It has words soothingly falling on your ears kind of quality. The book drags on at many places but somehow holds your interest so as to finish. Whether it’s be "Memory Game" or "Kim's Game", as the narrator describes them and then confesses to confusing the two, game theory becomes the controlling conceit for this exploration of family solidarity and family secrets. A terrible murder (with attendant ramifications of incest) is disclosed 25 years after the victim, a beautiful and enigmatic teenager, has been buried in a pit right outside the front door of her home. The gruesome discovery of a pregnant girl, who had been thought, by all but the murderer--to be merely missing, becomes the stimulus for the narrator, her childhood friend and rival, to embark on a quest to recover dark hidden memories of a vanished childhood among the "blue remembered hills" of her "land of lost content." The account that follows--with its frequent forays into psychotherapeutic sessions, is gripping, even as mesmerizing as the psychotherapist himself seems to be, and the narrator goes through an ominous process of question and answer only to find ultimately that the "truth" of her breakthrough is not truth at all. The only disappointing part of this process comes in the rushed conclusion following her acceptance of the validity of the "false-memory" syndrome (an exposition of which is glossed over far too hurriedly); the dénouement seems strangely contrived and much less believable than what has preceded it. Nevertheless this is an absorbing read. It will please the literary minded as well as mystery lovers. It has certainly left this reader with a taste for more from this spellbinding writer. If you are a fan of mystery/detective stories, you'll like this book. If you like a bit of psychology thrown in, you'll like it even more. It's easy and quick to read and makes you think twice about psychological fashions like 'recovered memories'. The psychological thriller is an increasingly important part of the mystery genre but the tag is an odd one since any mystery novel worth its salt delves into the psychology of the characters in it. But it is apt as a description of Nicci French's novels because of their concentration on character. The main asset that “The Memory Game” is that it is an energy packed one, with a continuity stream in the plotting. This is especially essential and crucial when the storyline is a very familiar and oft used one. The book was simply all over the place, there were too many subplots and the subplot involving Natalie and her mysterious disappearance sometimes got lost as it jostled for attention with these other subplots. As a result that atmosphere of suspense and tension you would expect of a really good mystery novel gets even more intense. Another factor that will attract you regarding this book, was that there were (literally) too many characters, and not all of them were really necessary to this novel at all. Obviously, this was French's first novel, and equally obviously, French has gone on to write much, much more exciting and compelling novels. Given the plot and the sequence of the events that followed one after another, and most importantly that “The Memory Game” is the first venture of Nicci French, the husband wife writer duo, you will surely find yourself stuck to the story narration. The link at www.rightbooks.in/product_details.asp?pid=9780141034133&The%20Memory%20Game lets you buy this literature venture, and you have RightBooks.in to accompany with all the buying details.

Anne Tyler directs with Noah’s Compass

Something clutches at the heart in the opening pages of Noah's Compass, the latest offering from Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist Anne Tyler. It's not just that Liam Pennywell, the protagonist, at 60 is laid off, divorced, apparently alone in the world and, within a week of being downsized, has swapped his large, old-fashioned, dignified apartment for a cinderblock box on the outskirts of Baltimore. If you flip through Noah’s Compass a second time, you notice that there’s quite a lot about doors. The most important ones in the novel are the patio doors that Liam Pennywell leaves open on his night in the small apartment he takes in a scuzzy part of Baltimore after he loses his job teaching ancient history at a private school. A burglar slips through them, brains Liam and then escapes without taking anything, but leaving a bite mark on his victim’s hand. Noah didn't need a compass, a rudder or a sextant because he wasn't going anywhere; he just bobbed along trying to stay afloat. Liam Pennywell, the 60-year-old narrator of Anne Tyler's latest novel, "Noah's Compass", has been getting by without a compass for years. Alone, unemployed, a little lonely, closed off, thinking his life is behind him, Liam has what you call a "life-changing experience". In fact, he has two of them; one is physical and the other metaphorically dangles in front of him his much-needed "compass", if he'll only recognize it. To open an Anne Tyler novel is to open yourself to care about her characters and "Noah's Compass" is no different. Chances are there that you’ll fall in love with Liam Pennywell and Eunice Dunstead, (a "rememberer"). Even Tyler's less loving characters are appealing through their all-too-human faults. Liam's stern older sister, his brisk ex-wife, and his three daughters, are all endearing in their own way. One never wishes evil on a Tyler character because they all reflect back something of yourselves. Her characters are familiar, archetypal and "Tyler-esque"; in all her novels we see people who are stumbling around in the dark. They don't even grope for their identities and their life purposes; those things just seem to fall upon them like odds and ends off an attic shelf. During the course of this seemingly simple yet complex little novel, you are introduced to the cast of characters that make up Liam's past - his wives, his daughters, his own parents, and an oddball (this is Anne Tyler country) woman with whom Liam establishes a rapport. There is not a lot of action in this novel. Although the storyline doesn’t span over a long time period, and the story takes place over just one year. Yet, Anne Tyler once again makes brilliant observations about people and what makes us tick. You may think your experiences and reflections and hopes and dreams are unique - but they're not. They are shared, and there were many moments in this book that just had me shaking my head in recognition and empathy. Her observations about aging are spot on, and her scripting is not just a pleasure to go on reading, but also a thought provoking one for you. Noah's Compass is a beautifully subtle book, an elegant contemplation of what it means to be happy and the consequences of a defensive withdrawal from other people. Life, Tyler seems say, is at its best when we let it be messy and unstructured; when, like Jonah, we allow ourselves to colour outside the lines. Just the perfect projection of life that this book by Tyler brings to you, and RightBooks.in gives you the chance to buy it. Get into the page at www.rightbooks.in/product_details.asp?pid=9780099549390&Noah%20s%20Compass now for all the buying formalities.

Frederick Forsyth flexes Devil’s Alternative that saved the world

It’s a flavor of realism that will set Devil’s Alternative a different one read about, and the solid plotting of the backdrop during the cold war phase in the early 80’s is something that will keep you engaged after you have started going through it. Although a dated novel (first published in 1979), this is still an enjoyable read for Forsyth fans. About the aversion of global war via deft manipulation by players - leaders, bureaucrats, spies - of the then world's political powerhouses of USA, Russia and Britain. Engaging diplomatic and political suspense. Devil’s Alternative is another of his fast paced, easy to read stories with a good long story. You’ll love the detail of the USSR government, you really feel like it in a non-fiction book at times. He has always used a lot of good factual details to make his books solid. Like the work of all good authors, you really grow to know the characters, like some and hate some - they have solid reasons for doing what they are doing in the book. There is a lot going on but the way he writes it you do not have any problems following the action. A great book that is well worth the time. Forsyth knows his stuff, and has done a perfect job of researching the Halls of Power on both sides of the ocean. His depiction of the Soviet Politburo in action is one of the best representations in all of fiction. His use of technology (for example the tank case.) is well done, with no inaccuracies. In the plotting, you will see a situation where the entire Soviet Union wheat crop is destroyed by a devastating string of failures, the population faces starvation. The USA is quick to offer assistance. They devise a plan to trade vital food resources with the Russians in exchange for sensitive political information. But the Politburo has other ideas: the invasion of Western Europe to commandeer the food for themselves. The Politburo chief just manages to stop the war plan, but two Ukrainian nationalists had other ideas, and they intervene into the situation any killing the KGB chief. En route of their escape, they are arrested, and their followers have no other option to rescue them but to hijack a supertanker and threatening to spill the entire oil into the sea, if their leader is not released.. USSR will stop negotiating with USA about the information exchange if they are released, and the big countdown has began, either an ecological massacre, or the probable third world war for food that might destroy the world. As ever, Forsyth is impeccable in his description of places and events. He can tell you how many paces it takes to cross a bridge in Moscow, or the décor inside the Kremlin. However, it is his attention to detail when talking of events at the level of international power politics, or the thoughts and feelings of a peasant tilling his fields, which is so impressive. We need to bear in mind that he is a trained journalist who has been in hotspots in his time. He isn’t just an armchair thriller writer. That is why, perhaps, his novels have the power to enthrall. He leads us through seemingly unconnected avenues, which gradually, ever so gradually, start to merge. We see a picture in which one man’s fanaticism could smash the best laid plans of superpowers and the hopes and worries of a man who leads a nation and who needs the help of his enemies to prevent an extremist bent on conflict taking over from him. In all this is a British agent and his love of old. We see how old fires can be relit and burn again with an intensity all of their own. Forsyth stokes those fires. Surely you’ll love this book to go through, and www.rightbooks.in/product_details.asp?pid=9780099552918&Devils%20Alternative,%20The is where you’ll get this book absolutely at the price you hardly have imagined. Come and experience the facility that RightBooks.in has kept in place for you.

Chris Eyan knows how it feels when one is left with “Zero Option”

When you are left with no other options, you dare to do the unthinkable. You can’t see your loved ones sufferings, and yet you are helpless, and are bound to do what you are ordered. Doesn’t matter whether the execution demands you to go back to your forgettable past, you just have to do it, and in case you fail to do so, your world is shattered. Chris Ryan has narrated exactly that, and the ex-secret agent in his “Zero Option” has to do everything that he left long ago, only to let his son and girlfriend survive. May be this plotting is very much with the innumerable Hollywood blockbusters, but the story telling in “Zero Option” is something with a difference, and a mystery with a touching soul kind appeal is what Chris has scripted for you. Few mystery cults have the capability to make you feel assimilated with the storyline, and definitely “Zero Option” falls in this classification. In spite of accusations of embellishment, Ryan's autobiographical “Zero Option” certainly had a ring of realism about it, which set it apart in the genre, and made it a bestseller. Ryan recreates that sense of reality in his action sequences in his early novels, and this book is worth buying for those alone. His storyline, however, is far more convincing than you actually anticipated, and you’ll find that events conveniently and continually fell into place, to bring about an unpredictable outcome. Continuing straight from Stand by, the prequel of “Zero Option”, Chris Ryan digs right in from the moment you open the book. Starting off with great suspense, Ryan quickly moves onto the action with a mission to assassinate a man who has caused Sharp nothing but pain. With attachable characters and a great story, this book is really a special one to treat your love for quality storyline. In zero option the story continues from when Geordie Sharp (A SAS soldier who is the main person in this book) comes home and finds his family kidnapped by the PIRA (PIRA is a provisional version of the IRA). 'When Geordie discovers his family (his son and girlfriend) have been kidnapped he spends the next few months trying to rescue them, of course the SAS are helping as much as they can by tracing calls and raiding flats. Of course they are also doing it in hope that they will capture any important PIRA person. During this time they send him on a mission to Libya to assassinate a person financing the PIRA who also tortured Geordie and his team when they were captured in Iraq, but when he comes home he discovers that the PIRA have made a demand and unless they follow it Geordie family is dead. The demand is to hand over Declan O'Farrell, and Declan is a person who is a key character in the PIRA and was caught in the Colombian jungle by Geordie and his SAS team. There is a problem; Declan is locked in a high-security prison. Geordie thinks up a plan and with the help of the SAS carries it out and gets Declan, then after Geordie fails to get a hostage swap carried out successfully the PIRA give him a final demand which if not carried out will leave Geordie's family dead, and that to assassinate the Prime Minister.' The book was a great read and very interesting. Definitely you will agree that it is well written and has good descriptions of characters and a good setting. The book was good as it was unpredictable and that kept it interesting. The book also has a great ending as it is exciting and has an interesting twist at the very end. And you got it easy to get this book at your desk, simply just by visiting www.rightbooks.in/product_details.asp?pid=9780099460138&Zero%20Option that RightBooks.in has kept in place.

Ian Caldwell and Dustin Thomason bring “The Rule of Four” that can change life

Since the arrival of Dan Brown, there has been an encouraging practice of trying a different line of murder mysteries. These mysteries centers around an ancient secret that must be kept secret, and any effort to unveil that can invite serious troubles, even death. Breath taking pace of the story line, interesting plots, twists in almost every sub plots, and the suspense is kept intact till the page-a great time for the suspense thriller fans, and the writer duo of Ian Caldwell and Dustin Thomason comes with the latest in the market. “The Rule of Four” is no doubt an engaging murder mystery that has all the essential elements to draw your attention, and it wants to be a murder mystery, an ancient secrets thriller, a coming-of-age novel, a philosophical tome, and an exploration of the academic life. While a laudable goal, it succeeds at some of these better than others. The comparison with Da Vinci code is an obvious one, but “The Rule of Four” manages to keep its originality to keep attracting you. An ivy league murder, a mysterious coded manuscript, and the secrets of a Renaissance prince collide memorably in “The Rule of Four”, a brilliant work of fiction that weaves together suspense and scholarship, high art and unimaginable treachery. It’s Easter at Princeton. Seniors are scrambling to finish their theses. And two students, Tom Sullivan and Paul Harris, are a hair's breadth from solving the mysteries of the Hypnerotomachia Poliphili--a renowned text attributed to an Italian nobleman, a work that has baffled scholars since its publication in 1499. For Tom, their research has been a link to his family's past, and an obstacle to the woman he loves. For Paul, it has become an obsession, the very reason for living. But as their deadline looms, research has stalled, until a long-lost diary surfaces with a vital clue. And when a fellow researcher is murdered just hours later, Tom and Paul realize that they are not the first to glimpse the Hypnerotomachia 's secrets. Suddenly the stakes are raised, and as the two friends sift through the codes and riddles at the heart of the text, they are beginning to see the manuscript in a new light, not simply as a story of faith, eroticism and pedantry, but as a bizarre, coded mathematical maze. And as they come closer and closer to deciphering the final puzzle of a book that has shattered careers, friendships and families, they know that their own lives are in mortal danger. Because at least one person has been killed for knowing too much. And they know even more. From the streets of fifteenth-century Rome to the rarified realm of the Ivy League, from a shocking 500 year-old murder scene to the drama of a young man's coming of age, “The Rule of Four” takes you on an entertaining, illuminating tour of history, as it builds to a pinnacle of nearly unbearable suspense. The second half of the novel reads much quicker than the first, and it's worth wading through the first section to get there. By this time you've come to know Tom and Paul well, they start unraveling the mysteries, and they face harsh realizations where their outer and inner demons lie. While far from a perfect novel, if such a thing exists, “The Rule of Four” ultimately becomes an entertaining read that will draw you into their world. By the time the ride of suspense is completed at the book's end, it's also succeeded at making the reader think and ponder his decisions in life. “The Rule of Four” is a worthy addition to anyone's library who appreciates a suspenseful and thought-provoking novel. And the discounts offered by RightBooks.in are extra reasons for you to go shopping for this book, and this page at www.rightbooks.in/product_details.asp?pid=9780099451952&Rule%20Of%20Four,%20The becomes your destination to get them.

Sheila Quigley brings you the Vampire series again with “ The Bad Moon Rising” at the backdrop

Darkness has always been the one you had wanted to read. It’s the dark shades that resides inside the human characters, and the more complex it is, the more interesting it is. It’s a dark deep fantasy that your mind wants to get attached with, and Sheila Quigley scripts the perfect narration of that, with the psychological thriller that revolves around the Vampires, with “ The Bad Moon Rising” being the theme maker. This is a tightly written, well-researched psychological crime thriller. From the opening page through to the final scenes, Frances di Plino guides the reader through a labyrinth of twists and turns in both the main plot and multiple sub-plots, all of which may lead to a potential serial murderer who is targeting the local prostitutes. All the characters are believable with just enough back-story allowed to permeate through the text, to leave the reader wanting to know more. The unputdownable new novel from the author of Run for Home. A young woman walks home by herself, the tapping of her high heels the only sound. At two o'clock in the morning, it's cold, the streets are deserted, and she thinks she's all-alone. Waiting for her, sleeping soundly in his bed, is her baby son. When he wakes up the next morning his mother still isn't back. She's never coming back. Because the streets weren't as deserted as she'd thought. Three women are dead, and Detective Inspector Lorraine Hunt is searching for a serial killer. In Houghton-le-Spring it's Feast week, a time when all hell is let loose as the fair comes to town, and a frenzy of celebration and decadence provides a temporary distraction from the grim realities of everyday life. It's not a good time to be searching for a stranger. It's not a good time to be a woman alone. This crime novel is a page-turner. Anyone picking it up will fly through it - they'll be so desperate to find out what's really going on. The plot is a satisfying, twisty-turny mystery and the novel introduces a fascinating new addition to crime detectives in Paulo Storey, your damaged hero. Sheila Quigley is still a relatively new author, and in the first book you meet Lorraine as well as some of her colleagues she works with such as Carter, Luke and Sara. You’ll also see featured some of the Lumsdon family who were in the first book. The one thing you are going to like about reading this book is that you’ll be already have a feel for the area and the characters and how they interact with each other. You’ll know Lorraine's feelings on certain people which makes you feel like you already know the characters that little bit more. Having said that, it certainly isn't necessary to read the first book as this book gives you adequate background. The story itself sees Lorraine and her team tackling a series of murders at a time when the town is preparing for an annual event called Feast Week. There is also an interesting second thread concerning a missing young girl which made for an interesting take on all the things happening in the town. The book, as with the first one, was very easy to read and there was plenty going on. The story is great and the writing style good enough to keep you turning the pages. Brilliant such a lovely yet frilling read, its certain that you will love the way Sheila Quigley focuses on a range of characters and makes you want to no more about them. Especially, you are going to love inspector lorraine hunt from the start and how even though she is trying to figure out the case's she is somehow brought into the families lives who are affected. Definitely a worth that you’ll finish at one shot, and when you are racing to get this copy, you have the page at www.rightbooks.in/product_details.asp?pid=9780099465751&Bad%20Moon%20Rising to make your visit, and none other than RightBooks.in has brought this one for you.

The dark secret deepens as Karin Slaughter defines the Kisscut

It’s an explosive outing in the mystery segment, and this Karin Slaughter drafted Kisscut tells you just that. Kisscut is Karin Slaughter's sophomore novel, the follow-up to Blind sighted, which introduced readers to the residents, politics and crime rampant in Heartsdale, a small Georgia town. The local pediatrician and coroner, Sara Linton, has an on-again off-again relationship with her ex-husband, Jeffrey, the town's sheriff. Their complex interplay is one of the driving forces of Slaughter's novels. The book opens explosively. A high school student named Jenny, one of Sara's patients, confronts a teenage boy outside a roller-skating rink, threatening him with a loaded gun. Sara witnesses the event from its onset and Jeffrey arrives on the scene shortly after it starts. The altercation escalates and he is forced to do the unthinkable, to shoot one of the teenagers. The confrontation sets into motion a complex investigation of a group of teens in Grant County. Immediately after the shooting, a newborn baby is found in the bathroom at the rink. The natural assumption is that it belonged to Jenny, but Sara's postmortem examination reveals that not only could Jenny not have given birth to the child, but also that she bore strange mutilations that leave Sara reeling. How could she have missed the bizarre pathology that led to these mutilations during previous visits to her clinic? And whose baby is it? Sara, Jeffrey and detective Lena Adams interview Jenny's family, friends and teachers to find out how much was known of Jenny's situation before the fatal night outside the rink. The investigation reveals a secret organization operating in and around Grant County, one that exploits vulnerable teenagers for its own vast profit. Worse, though, is the realization that the people involved in this revolting trade actually enjoy what they are doing to the community's children. As Jeffrey follows the tangled threads connecting the criminals together, he is amazed by what he learns. Kisscut takes an unflinching look at a brutal and dark side of modern society.
Slaughter also uses the situation to explore her series characters. Lena, one of Jeffrey's deputies, suffered a humiliating assault in an earlier case (from Blindsighted) and is still fighting to recover from the physical and emotional scars. Already formal and distant with her coworkers, the attack has left her fragile and unpredictable. Jeffrey, Lena and Sara interact awkwardly in general, but it is the awkwardness of familiarity and emotional rawness. These people know each other's sore spots and often use them to their own advantage. All three are guilty of scoring points off each other, often needlessly, sometimes thoughtlessly, and occasionally deliberately. Slaughter's books are mentioned in the same sentence as those of Patricia Cornwell, but the sole similarity is that both authors write about women pathologists. Slaughter's style is unique, she's not a Cornwell wannabe. Her writing is edgier. She doesn't shy away from looking directly at a scene of violence and seeing it for exactly what it is, forcing the reader to look along with her. While Kisscut stands alone, readers will appreciate Lena's situation and the awkward relationship between Jeffrey and Sara better if they read Blindsighted first. So far, Slaughter has rid Grant County of a deranged man who tortured and murdered women and a group of predators victimizing teenagers. For such a quiet little town, Heartsdale, Georgia has more than its fair share of violent criminals. From real-life newspaper headlines of late, perhaps this isn't such a stretch. Just check www.rightbooks.in/product_details.asp?pid=9780099421788&Kisscut that takes you there, and RightShopping.in is what your pick will be.

Clive Cussler sends Dirk Pitt to the sacred Inca Gold

Clive Cussler has been a master at the adventure narration, with Dark Pitt being his central character of his adventure flicks. In his fifth effort of Dirk Pitt series, called “ The Inca Gold”, the charm is even vintager, and RightShopping.in is happy to bring this classy adventure flick to read. A strong opening draws the reader in immediately with divers being rescued from a sinkhole in Peru. The mystery deepens as Pitt sets out on the trail of a vast treasure, including the golden bodysuit of Tiapollo. Pitt's then-girlfriend, Congresswoman Loren Smith, also gets to play a significant secondary role. One of the challenges any author in this genre faces is overcoming an inherent lack of suspense. In this story, you have Inca legend, Francis Drake and evil art/artifact smugglers and forgers. As you have come to expect from Clive Cussler, there are several sub-plots and almost a series of adventures neatly wrapped in one book. The hero, Dirk Pitt starts this adventure by rescuing the stunning Dr Kelsey and her diving partner from the chill depths of an isolated jungle cenote and is then compelled to rescue himself after everyone else is kidnapped by guerillas. Undeterred he tracks the group through the jungle and, you really should read this book. It all begins in 1533 in what is described as a forgotten which carries an Incan vessel to a destination unknown. Mysteriously the vessel pulls up to the shore sending the peaceful hunters and trappers calling that piece of coastline fleeing for the hills to take cover from the men they have never had contact with before. A small group returns in one week to see they have slipped away just as quietly and mysteriously as they arrived. Nothing was disturbed except for a huge rock that was amazingly transformed into a disturbingly grotesque winged jaguar/serpent with fangs. All other traces of their presence were gone and they were never seen by the tribesmen again. In 1578 a Spanish warship chasing down a possible enemy of the crown in the Magellan Straits unsure of what they have gotten them self into. Before long Captain Juan de Anton makes out that his quarry is none other than the Golden Hind captained by none other than Sir Frances Drake carrying a cargo load of gold and silver. Even knowing Drake's reputation, de Anton judges her with a worthy gamble and the clash begins. Suffice it to say That as Drake lived until 1596, he pulled out of the encounter alive, however not a day passed that he didn't relive that battle and a mysterious jade box that was knotted with cords. Moving ahead to 1998, Pitt finds himself pulled away from his NUMA duties to save an archaeologist, a beautiful female one no less, from drowning in an ancient sacrificial pool in the Andes Mountains of Peru. This is where the mystery resumes as Pitt is drawn into a series of events that leads to a crime syndicate, corruption at it's highest levels, and of course unraveling the mystery of the jade box, the winged jaguar/serpent, and so much more. What does it all have to do with each other? You'll have to read this one for yourself to watch it all unfold one action packed page after the other. Like so many Of the Pitt novels penned by Cussler Inca Gold is 577 pages that demand to be read in bulk. It is too good to read only a chapter or two at a time as Cussler continually creates one cliffhanger after another while answering just enough of the mystery to keep the reader from becoming frustrated. Nobody builds suspense like Cussler in this genre of mystery and suspense and Inca Gold may be one of his best efforts ever bar none. Something truly great to read about, and this page at www.rightbooks.in/product_details.asp?pid=9780007353286&Inca%20Gold brings you to the chance to execute that.

Be re-introduced with the vintage Sittaford Msytery that Agatha Christie penned long ago

Classics have the eternal appeal, and even after you experience it after long long years, its appeal remains intact as it was. For the mystery classics, this observation is further true. Take this Sittaford Msytery that Agatha Christie has penned way back in 1931.Several generations have passed, but still the mystery flavor has remained intact for this flick, and the page at www.rightbooks.in/product_details.asp?pid=9780007299751&Agatha%20Christie%20The%20Sittaford%20Myste takes you to the plotting, if you still haven’t gone through it. The Sittaford Mystery, like The Murder at the Vicarage seems to reflect Christie looking for, if a not a new pattern for writing her books, at least the introduction of a new variation within the mix. Once again, as in several earlier books, the most proactive of the characters is a young woman although the point of view is not hers. The mystery itself is less ornately planned than many of the earlier Christies and is a rare example of a believable “Eureka” moment of detection. All the information the reader needs to at least suspect the real murderer has been laid before them and they are given every chance to make the same deduction as the detectives. This book shares something else with its immediate predecessor and that is a sharp move away from the pattern in the earlier books of showing spirited and intelligent young women being drawn to strong men. In earlier books Christie even writes of this tendency as if it was an evolutionary compulsion. However in this and the previous book she shows bright intelligent young women drawn to quieter less stereotypically manly men. Throughout this book it is clear that Emily Trefusis is brighter than her fiancée as well as having a stronger moral backbone. Yet at the end it is not presented as a tragedy that she does not leave her fiancée for the clearly more intelligent and ambitious Enderby. Yes, Emily clearly loves James Pearson but the reader is left to wonder if part of that love is the fact that he is a malleable and fertile field for the expression of her own intelligence and ambition. It's easy to kill if no one suspects you, and in the situation Luke Fitzwilliam has wandered into, that seems to be the case. A series of deaths has mostly gone unnoticed-- unfortunate accidents, they seemed, but not to everyone. Lavinia Fullerton has suspicions and premonitions, but she is run down on her way to alert the authorities. After hearing Lavinia's story retired police office Luke Fitzwilliam decides to do a bit of investigating of his own. He finds a small town with a variety of eccentricities. In some ways, this novel follows the typical Christie pattern: murder, a variety of suspects, and an unsuspected conclusion. This particular Christie has more of an element of danger, however, which adds excitement. We actually get to see some action, not just the detective revealing his or her conclusions at the end. Christie has also been successful in underlining the fact that apparantly; it is remarkably easy to kill. This was delightful tale of murder, spirits and true love. Christie filled her book with all the usual suspects including a mysterious woman who is not who she says she is, a host of poor relatives, a loyal servant, an ex-army officer and a recluse. Miss Emily Trefusis is a very modern young woman at a time when modern women were not easily accepted, especially in the English countryside. Her strength, charm and intelligence pay off in the end as she manages to uncover key clues and figure out how the seance and murder are connected. Check here at www.rightbooks.in/product_details.asp?pid=9780007299751&Agatha%20Christie%20The%20Sittaford%20Myste to see how the mystery got solved.

Sidney Sheldon unveils to face off "The Naked Face"

Sidney Sheldon has been the undisputed name in the suspense thrillers, and in this Naked Face, he has proved his worth, when its a matter of mystery narration. Anyone who has read any of Sidney Sheldon's novels will know that he is extraordinary in his writing, and this novel is no exception--as long as you read it with the mindset of getting something really jaw dropping, and in his very first venture, Sheldon stood your expectations, and this book is at your pick, with the link at www.rightbooks.in/product_details.asp?pid=9780007253913&The%20Naked%20Face being your address to visit. Keeping that understanding that this is a first timers writing effort, chances are there that you'll love The Naked Face, and now you got RightBooks.in to let you have this venture. This book shows its age in such things as its portrayals of psychiatry, the police, and the bad guys. Even the aspects that are dated are interesting in that they show how much things have changed, both in how the worlds of crime and its investigation operate, and in how things are understood. For example: psychiatry no longer understands homosexuality as a 'disease' that needs or desires a cure - individual psychiatrists undoubtedly do, but the professional diagnostic guide dropped this decades ago. So if you are looking for sort of an interesting historical document that's also a fun crime novel, this might do the trick. This novel is a straightforward crime thriller, someone is trying to kill the main character, a psychologist, and he's trying to figure out who the killer is before he becomes the victim. In The Naked Face, Sheldon gave Stephen King a run for his money, competing with King's ability to unearth the gritty emotional core of Homo sapiens. This was one of my favorites of Sheldon's mainstream novels; I've read most of those works, some more than once. The psychological depth of Sidney's characters, exposing inner visions of various disturbances, came out with amazing clarity and complexity in this novel. It appeared to me that Sidney understood the inside, underside, and upside of the human psyche, possibly in a more intuitive way than a practicing psychiatrist. Compared to his later works, it is not as multifaceted a mystery, but the plot will hold the reader until it unwinds at the conclusion. Judd Stevens is a top-notch psychoanalyst and out of nowhere, a patient and his trusted secretary are murdered. He becomes a target as well, and escapes only by default. Hiring a private investigator becomes a questionable issue as well as wondering if he can trust the lead detective on the case, McGreavy, who doubts Judd's every move. Fearing for the well being of his patients as well as himself and his sanity, he must get to the bottom of this mystery. I was completely taken back by the discovery of the murderer - would have never guessed. While "The Naked Face" does not have the intensity of Sheldon's later novels, it is still a very good read. Written 40 years ago, the book still packs a punch. It doesn’t contain as much of the violence and “creative” killing seen so frequently today, but it is one of the first to explore psychological profiling. It moves quickly and is an easy read. The characters are well developed and are likeable. The story situation immediately grabs the reader and makes the reader want to find out “whodunit.” Some may be surprised to find out it is not exactly who they expect, and that is part of the fun.
There is minimal sex and swearing. There is some graphic violence, but not nearly as bad as one reads today. Since the story is 40 years old, it is nice to go back memory lane to see what the norms and mores were at the time. Some may call it quaint, but in my opinion it is simply fun. Overall, it’s worth the read for a good story and a little nostalgia. A great stuff at www.rightbooks.in/product_details.asp?pid=9780007253913&The%20Naked%20Face that is awaiting your visit all the way to let you have this Harper Collins publication work.

Richard Thomas talks about how It’s A Miracle Real Life Inspirational Stories, Extraordinary Events And Everyday Wonders

Truth is stranger than fiction, and often this is true in real life. You don’t need to visit movie halls and fictitious novels to know about the unbelievable happening in life, real life offers you the same instead, and Richard Thomas narrates you the same with It’s A Miracle Real Life Inspirational Stories, Extraordinary Events And Everyday Wonders, with the RightBooks.in channels in action to offer you that. The visit to this link at www.rightbooks.in will be a story of your lifetime, for, this visit brings you examples from the commoners like you, who did the unbelievable. Richard Thomas, most famous for his portrayal of John Boy in the US television series The Waltons, presents his own selection of inspirational real-life stories of everyday miracles that have touched peoples lives, from amazing acts of heroism to miraculously answered prayers. This book, actually oriented toward Judaism, is just what it says: stories of "extraordinary coincidences from everyday life." The stories are inspiring and show, even when they're not meant to, that God really is in charge, and that His purposes for us are loving. Small Miracles, is a page turner filled with real life stories collected by the author that portray the amazing wonder of coincidences or rather, how life is just one miracle happening after another. This is a real simple book and none of these inspiring tales go over 7 pages. So if you are looking for something to be motivated by but don't have the time for a whole novel, Small Miracles is for you. The range of miracles moves from everyday cute to overwhelmingly beautiful, so by the time you are done with all these new life understandings your sure to be ready to live with more colors then ever before. Everything happens for a reason. Believe in destiny. A book filled with uplifting positive short stories...motivating to see the bigger meaning in every day's little thing. It’s A Miracle Real Life Inspirational Stories, Extraordinary Events And Everyday Wonders just tells you that. This book will let you move, will make you wonder, will make you to be among the joys, you’ll be sad at the tragedies as well, and the jaw dropping unbelievable stuffs to make the dream come true, this Harper Collins project just talks about everything. Either astonishing coincidences, answered prayers, or amazing acts of heroism, the stories in It’s a Miracle range from angel encounters to extraordinary animal stories, from amazing rescues to remarkable medical recoveries – all inspirational tales to raise the spirits. With a foreword by Richard Thomas, this is a selection of his favourite stories, and each of the stories will have one common perception for you, that it could have been your story as well. In this inspirational third volume of miraculous stories, Richard Thomas, host of PAX TV's It's a Miracle, has selected dozens of all-new stories. Each will touch your soul and strengthen your spirit. Included is the story of a pregnant woman's baby being saved by an amazing encounter with two "angels" on earth and a firefighter who gives a remarkable gift to the buddy who saved his life and sets off a chain reaction of miracles. Answered prayers, divine intervention, miraculous reuses, inspiring reunions, heartwarming animal stories, remarkable medical recoveries. They're all here...a true testament to the human spirit. Be there at www.rightbooks.in/product_details.asp?pid=9780007279111&It%20s%20A%20Miracle%20Real%20Life%20Inspirational%20Stories,%20Extraordinary%20Events%20And%20Everyday%20Wonders to meet the reflection of your life.

Colleen McCullough states the plot that propelled "Too Many Murder"

Murder mysteries are always of its own appeal, but when there are “ Too Many Murders”, definitely the plot is not something that you read about everyday. That’s the specialty that Colleen McCullough maintains, and you got to visit www.rightbooks.in/product_details.asp?pid=9780007271863&Too%20Many%20Murders to unveil that. Its been the RightBooks.in service that you kept accounting for, and your search for the quality mystery venture ends with this Harpercollins UK Publication work. McCullough has, of late, turned her mind to crime fiction with Too Many Murders being the second of her novels to feature Captain Carmine Delmonico and the police force of Holloman Connecticut. It opens on the 3rd of April 1967. A young student at the small city’s prestigious university is killed in a particularly gruesome way. One nasty murder would be enough to cope with in the relatively crime free city but there are 11 other murders on the same day and the small police force is stretched beyond its limits. Despite the fact that there are a variety of methods used and none of the victims appear to have anything in common Carmine Delmonico begins to suspect that there is a single person responsible for all of the deaths. Twelve seemingly unrelated murders occur on that fateful day. Chief of detectives Carmine Delmonico and his unit are swimming in crime scene evidence, lengthy survivor interview files, and few if any suspects. The mayor and the media are clamoring for solutions to these gruesome deaths. The 12 victims have nothing in common: head of the large conglomerate Cornucopia, a med student, a prostitute, a housewife, her autistic baby, a banker, an old woman, a girl who was saving up for college, a college dean, a cleaning lady and two boys. The modus operandi for all of these people is different too: “four poisonings, a sex crime, three shootings, a whore’s violent end, two suffocations and a bear trap”. Captain Carmine Delmonico of the Holloman homicide department is called in. After delegating the cases to his teammates, Carmine realizes that it can’t be a coincidence that there are so many murders on a single day in a city the size of Holloman. They must be connected. But since none of the victims have anything in common, how can they be connected? With his two subordinates, Abe and Corey, his meticulous secretary Delia Carstairs, and the medical examiner Patrick, Carmine starts investigating. Initially, when it comes to light that harrowed wives killed two of the men, Carmine believes that the feminist movement connects the murders. Meanwhile, an FBI agent is investigating espionage at Cornucopia, so there is the possibility that the Russian spy could be behind the murders. After all, they are in the middle of a Cold War. The motives behind each of the murders make for interesting sub-plots. Carmine’s personal life, his second marriage, his relationships with his daughter Sophia and her stepfather Myron are also described in great detail. Carmine has to choose between his two deputies and appoint one a lieutenant. All these sub plots add to the drama, keeping the novel gripping. The story is set in a small city where everyone knows everyone else, against the backdrop of the Cold War and the feminist movement. What sets the book apart is the crime-solving technique. In an age when advanced investigation techniques like forensics were unavailable, the detectives have to rely on witness accounts, clues, and their ‘gut’, much like in a Sherlock Holmes novel You’ll really appraise this murder solving skill, and just get into www.rightbooks.in/product_details.asp?pid=9780007271863&Too%20Many%20Murders to be inside the mystery solving scene.

Clive Cussler sends Dirk Pitt to the sacred “Inca Gold”


Clive Cussler has been a master at the adventure narration, with Dark Pitt being his central character of his adventure flicks. In his fifth effort of Dirk Pitt series, called “Inca Gold”, the charm is even more vintage, and RightShopping.in is happy to bring this classy adventure flick to read. A strong opening draws the reader in immediately with divers being rescued from a sinkhole in Peru. The mystery deepens as Pitt sets out on the trail of a vast treasure, including the golden bodysuit of Tiapollo. Pitt's then-girlfriend, Congresswoman Loren Smith, also gets to play a significant secondary role. One of the challenges any author in this genre faces is overcoming an inherent lack of suspense. In this story, you have Inca legend, Francis Drake and evil art/artifact smugglers and forgers. As you have come to expect from Clive Cussler, there are several sub-plots and almost a series of adventures neatly wrapped in one book. The hero, Dirk Pitt starts this adventure by rescuing the stunning Dr Kelsey and her diving partner from the chill depths of an isolated jungle and is then compelled to rescue himself after everyone else is kidnapped by guerillas. Undeterred he tracks the group through the jungle and, you really should read this book. It all begins in 1533 in what is described as a forgotten which carries an Incan vessel to a destination unknown. Mysteriously the vessel pulls up to the shore sending the peaceful hunters and trappers calling that piece of coastline fleeing for the hills to take cover from the men they have never had contact with before. A small group returns in one week to see they have slipped away just as quietly and mysteriously as they arrived. Nothing was disturbed except for a huge rock that was amazingly transformed into a disturbingly grotesque winged jaguar/serpent with fangs. All other traces of their presence were gone and they were never seen by the tribesmen again. In 1578 a Spanish warship chasing down a possible enemy of the crown in the Magellan Straits unsure of what they have gotten them self into. Before long Captain Juan de Anton makes out that his quarry is none other than the Golden Hind captained by none other than Sir Frances Drake carrying a cargo load of gold and silver. Even knowing Drake's reputation, de Anton judges her worthy gamble and the clash begins. Suffice it to say That as Drake lived until 1596, he pulled out of the encounter alive, however not a day passed that he didn't relive that battle and a mysterious jade box that was knotted with cords. Moving ahead to 1998, Pitt finds himself pulled away from his NUMA duties to save an archaeologist, a beautiful female one no less, from drowning in an ancient sacrificial pool in the Andes Mountains of Peru. This is where the mystery resumes as Pitt is drawn into a series of events that leads to a crime syndicate, corruption at it's highest levels, and of course unraveling the mystery of the jade box, the winged jaguar/serpent, and so much more. What does it all have to do with each other? You'll have to read this one for yourself to watch it all unfold one action packed page after the other. Like so many Of the Pitt novels penned by Cussler “Inca Gold” is 577 pages that demand to be read in bulk. It is too good to read only a chapter or two at a time as Cussler continually creates one cliffhanger after another while answering just enough of the mystery to keep the reader from becoming frustrated. Nobody builds suspense like Cussler in this genre of mystery and suspense and Inca Gold may be one of his best efforts ever bar none. Something truly great to read about, and this page at www.rightbooks.in/product_details.asp?pid=9780007353286&Inca%20Gold brings you to the chance to execute that.

Anne Tyler directs with “Noah’s Compass”


Something clutches at the heart in the opening pages of “Noah's Compass”, the latest offering from Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist Anne Tyler. It's not just that Liam Pennywell, the protagonist, at 60 is laid off, divorced, apparently alone in the world and, within a week of being downsized, has swapped his large, old-fashioned, dignified apartment for a cinderblock box on the outskirts of Baltimore. You flip through “Noah’s Compass” a second time, you notice that there’s quite a lot about doors. The most important ones in the novel are the patio doors that Liam Pennywell leaves open on his night in the small apartment he takes in a scuzzy part of Baltimore after he loses his job teaching ancient history at a private school. A burglar slips through them, brains Liam and then escapes without taking anything, but leaving a bite mark on his victim’s hand. Noah didn't need a compass, a rudder or a sextant because he wasn't going anywhere; he just bobbed along trying to stay afloat. Liam Pennywell, the 60 year old narrator of Anne Tyler's latest novel, “Noah's Compass”, has been getting by without a compass for years. Alone, unemployed, a little lonely, closed off, thinking his life is behind him, Liam has what you call a "life-changing experience". In fact, he has two of them; one is physical and the other metaphorically dangles in front of him his much needed "compass", if he'll only recognize it. To open an Anne Tyler novel is to open yourself to care about her characters and Noah's Compass” is no different. Chances are there that you’ll fall in love with Liam Pennywell and Eunice Dunstead, (a "rememberer"). Even Tyler's less loving characters are appealing through their all-too-human faults. Liam's stern older sister, his brisk ex-wife, and his three daughters, are all endearing in their own way. One never wishes evil on a Tyler character because they all reflect back something of yourselves. Her characters are familiar, archetypal and "Tyler-esque"; in all her novels we see people who are stumbling around in the dark. They don't even grope for their identities and their life purposes, those things just seem to fall upon them like odds and ends off an attic shelf. During the course of this seemingly simple yet complex little novel, you are introduced to the cast of characters that make up Liam's past - his wives, his daughters, his own parents, and an oddball (this is Anne Tyler country) woman with whom Liam establishes a rapport. There is not a lot of action in this novel. Although the storyline doesn’t span over a long time period,, and the story takes place over just one year. Yet, Anne Tyler once again makes brilliant observations about people and what makes us tick. You may think your experiences and reflections and hopes and dreams are unique - but they're not. They are shared, and there were many moments in this book that just had me shaking my head in recognition and empathy. Her observations about aging are spot on, and her scripting is not just a pleasure to go on reading, but also a thought provoking one for you. Noah's Compass is a beautifully subtle book, an elegant contemplation of what it means to be happy and the consequences of a defensive withdrawal from other people. Life, Tyler seems say, is at its best when we let it be messy and unstructured; when, like Jonah, we allow ourselves to colour outside the lines. Just the perfect projection of life that this book by Tyler brings to you, and RightBooks.in gives you the chance to buy it. Get into the page at www.rightbooks.in/product_details.asp?pid=9780099549390&Noah%20s%20Compass now for all the buying formalities.

Explore the brutal world of organ trading, grave digging and child trafficking while unfurling the pages of “The Red Market” by Scott Carney

“The Red Market” unveils a horrifying scenario of the developing countries. Unfortunately India is the major seat of this deadly racket. Scott Carney is an investigative journalist and his latest release “The Red Market” is the output of his investigations. This book reveals a darker side of India that is bound to degrade the status of much hyped shining India. Scott Carney has highlighted the inhuman activities of some real life blood sucking vampires. Organ trading, child trafficking and grave digging are also part of this heinous crime scenario. Organ trade involves trading of transplantable organs like heart, kidney, liver. There is a worldwide shortage of these transplantable organs in the developed countries. So a certain chain is operating in the developing countries that capture poor people and keep them as a captive and then suck out every drop of blood from the captives including their organs. A huge racket is active in the countries like Pakistan, China, Philippines, Egypt and India. Scott Carney has stayed in India for five long years. During his stay he was in the charge of a group of American students. One of the students committed suicide and that was the start off point of Carney’s investigation. As he plunged into the depth of the mystery more gruesome facts started to creep up. Vast population, immense poverty and extreme corruption are the main roots of these activities. Carney has highlighted on spots like Kolkata and Gorakhpur in U.P. Gorakhpur is within the close proximity of Nepal and large number of Nepalese immigrants enters to India through this gateway and they are the major victims of these rackets. Most of the poor masses that serve the role of donors remain deprived. In very rare cases they are provided with a nominal amount in exchange of their valuable organs. Sometimes they are kidnapped or forcefully captured. Kidneys, hearts are dissected off from their bodies oozing out even the last drop of blood from them. These operations lead to fatal consequences causing death of number of innocent people. Carney has discovered a racket of gravediggers that supply bones to the American anatomy classes in midst of the bustling streets of Kolkata. Even the kids are not spared. Orphans from the orphanage are exported to American millionaires in exchange of large amount of money. Eggs and wombs are also part of this organ trading network. If you are willing to read this real life horror stories that are far more horrifying than the fictional stories and if you are ready to confront the brutal side of development of your country then visit our site RightBooks.in and go through this link www.rightbooks.in/product_details.asp?pid=9789350093511&The%20Red%20Market. Breathtaking scary real stories are waiting for you being entrapped in the pages of “The Red Market”.

Sidney Sheldon unveils to face off “The Naked Face”

Sidney Sheldon has been the undisputed name in the suspense thrillers, and in this naked face, he has proved his worth, when its a matter of mystery narration. Anyone who has read any of Sidney Sheldon's novels will know that he is extraordinary in his writing, and this novel is no exception--as long as you read it with the mindset of getting something really jaw dropping, and in his very first venture, Sheldon stood your expectation, and this book is at your pick, with the link at www.rightbooks.in being your address to visit. Keeping that understanding that this is a first timers writing effort, chances are there that you'll love “The Naked Face”, and now you got RightBooks.in to let you have this venture. This book shows its age in such things as its portrayals of psychiatry, the police, and the bad guys. Even the aspects that are dated are interesting in that they show how much things have changed, both in how the worlds of crime and its investigation operate, and in how things are understood. For example: psychiatry no longer understands homosexuality as a 'disease' that needs or desires a cure - individual psychiatrists undoubtedly do, but the professional diagnostic guide dropped this decades ago. So if you are looking for sort of an interesting historical document that's also a fun crime novel, this might do the trick. This novel is a straightforward crime thriller, someone is trying to kill the main character, a psychologist, and he's trying to figure out who the killer is before he becomes the victim. In “The Naked Face”, Sheldon gave Stephen King a run for his money, competing with King's ability to unearth the gritty emotional core of homo sapiens. This was one of my favorite of Sheldon's mainstream novels; I've read most of those works, some more than once. The psychological depth of Sidney's characters, exposing inner visions of various disturbances, came out with amazing clarity and complexity in this novel. It appeared to me that Sidney understood the inside, underside, and upside of the human psyche, possibly in a more intuitive way than a practicing psychiatrist. ompared to his later works, it is not as multifaceted a mystery, but the plot will hold the reader until it unwinds at the conclusion. Judd Stevens is a top-notch psychoanalyst and out of nowhere, a patient and his trusted secretary are murdered. He becomes a target as well, and escapes only by default. Hiring a private investigator becomes a questionable issue as well as wondering if he can trust the lead detective on the case, McGreavy, who doubts Judd's every move. Fearing for the well being of his patients as well as himself and his sanity, he must get to the bottom of this mystery. I was completely taken back by the discovery of the murderer - would have never guessed. While "The Naked Face" does not have the intensity of Sheldon's later novels, it is still a very good read. Written 40 years ago, the book still packs a punch. It doesn’t contain as much of the violence and “creative” killing seen so frequently today, but it is one of the first to explore psychological profiling. It moves quickly and is an easy read. The characters are well-developed and are likeable. The story situation immediately grabs the reader and makes the reader want to find out “whodunit.” Some may be surprised to find out it is not exactly who they expect, and that is part of the fun. There is minimal sex and swearing. There is some graphic violence, but not nearly as bad as one reads today. Since the story is 40 years old, it is nice to go back memory lane to see what the norms and mores were at the time. Some may call it quaint, but in my opinion it is simply fun. Overall, it’s worth the read for a good story and a little nostalgia. A great stuff at www.rightbooks.in/product_details.asp?pid=9780007253913&The%20Naked%20Face that is awaiting your visit all the way to let you have this Harper Collins publication work.

Rodney Castleden, Gordon Kerr lets you witness “Leaders Who Changed The World” from close

Throughout history there have been only a handful of people capable of this form of leadership. They include Jesus Christ, Moses, Mohammed and Buddha, without whom the major religions of this world simply would not exist. “Leaders Who Changed The World” explores the lives and careers of such extraordinary individuals as Confucious, Mahatma Gandhi, Eleanor of Aquitaine and Nelson Mandela. Some have slogged and suffered in order to change the world for the better, others like Adolf Hitler or Osama Bin Laden have only succeeded in damaging humanity. Some people in history seem to have been born to transform the world. Each person in this book made a totally original and individual contribution which had a significant long term impact on the world. His or her actions had a lasting effect on a great many lives at a profound level, which makes it a most compelling read.If you want to know what thought processes, discoveries etc that shaped the world you live in today, this is the book to read. It looks at the people and major events that have influenced the world over time and civilisations. It is quite objective and includes even people with doubtful and outright evil characters. The writer leaves you the reader with the choice to decide whose influence is good or bad. The writer duo Rodney Castleden, Gordon Kerr merely states the facts historically.In the five parts that this book is composed of, you get the details of the contributions and differences that the leaders from all the field Part one includes the ancient leaders, including Moses, Pythagoras, Buddha, Confucius, Plato, Aristotle, Alexander the Great, Julius Caesar, Jesus Christ, Attila the Hun., while the part two covers Medieval AND Renaissance period leaders, including Mohammed, William the Conqueror, Genghis Khan, Marco Polo Leonardo da Vinci, William Shakespeare. Part three involves the enlightened world leaders, including Cardinal Richelieu, Oliver Cromwell, Isaac Newton, James Cook, George Washington, Mozart, Horatio Nelson .Leaders like Napoleon, Duke of Wellington, Beethoven, Abraham Lincoln, Charles Darwin, Charles Dickens, Karl Marx, Tolstoy, Thomas Edison, Oscar Wilde comes in the 19th century difference makers, and the modern world leaders like Sigmund Freud, Frank Lloyd Wright, Gandhi, Lenin, Churchill, Einstein, Picasso, Hitler, Walt Disney, John F Kennedy, Nelson Mandela, Marilyn Monroe, Fidel Castro, Elvis Presley, The Beatles, Bill Gates, Tim Berners-Lee, Osama Bin Laden. are coming in the fifth part. Something you must wish to add to your book collections, and RightBooks.in shows you the way to execute that. Meet www.rightbooks.in/product_details.asp?pid=9780708801628&Leaders WhoChanged the World to result it now.